Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

News

Stephen Sondheim, A Musical Theater Legend, Dies At Age 91

Stephen Sondheim, A Musical Theater Legend, Dies At Age 91
Stephen Sondheim, A Musical Theater Legend, Dies At Age 91

Stephen Sondheim, the iconic songwriter whose lyrics transformed American musical theater in the twentieth century, has passed away. He was 91 years old when he died.

Touchaheart Nigeria reports that Rick Pappas, the composer’s Texas-based attorney, told The New York Times that the composer died on Friday at his Roxbury, Connecticut home.

Sondheim was born into a rich family on March 22, 1930, as the only son of dressmaker Herbert Sondheim and Helen Fox Sondheim. Sondheim influenced several generations of theater songwriters, particularly with such landmark musicals as “Company,” “Follies” and “Sweeney Todd,” which are considered among his best work. His most famous ballad, “Send in the Clowns,” has been recorded hundreds of times, including by Frank Sinatra and Judy Collins.

 

“The theater has lost one of its greatest geniuses and the world has lost one of its greatest and most original writers. Sadly, there is now a giant in the sky. But the brilliance of Stephen Sondheim will still be here as his legendary songs and shows will be performed for evermore,” producer Cameron Mackintosh wrote in tribute.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted: “Stephen Sondheim created fantastic worlds and characters, but at the heart of every story he told was a kid from New York City. And that kid was a legend. One of the brightest lights of Broadway is dark tonight. May he rest in peace.”

Six of Sondheim’s musicals won Tony Awards for best score, and he also received a Pulitzer Prize (“Sunday in the Park”), an Academy Award (for the song “Sooner or Later” from the film Dick Tracy), five Olivier Awards.

The New-York born composer also won eight Grammy Awards, nine Tony awards – including the special Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre – and one Academy Award.

In 2015, US President Barack Obama bestowed Sondheim the Presidential Medal of Freedom – the highest civilian award – for his work.

Early in his career, Sondheim wrote the lyrics for two shows considered to be classics of the American stage, “West Side Story” (1957) and “Gypsy” (1959). “West Side Story,” with music by Leonard Bernstein, transplanted Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” to the streets and gangs of modern-day New York. “Gypsy,” with music by Jule Styne, told the backstage story of the ultimate stage mother and the daughter who grew up to be Gypsy Rose Lee.

Stephen Sondheim, the iconic songwriter whose lyrics transformed American musical theater in the twentieth century, has passed away. He was 91 years old when he died.

Rick Pappas, the composer’s Texas-based attorney, told The New York Times that the composer died on Friday at his Roxbury, Connecticut home.

Sondheim was born into a rich family on March 22, 1930, as the only son of dressmaker Herbert Sondheim and Helen Fox Sondheim. Sondheim influenced several generations of theater songwriters, particularly with such landmark musicals as “Company,” “Follies” and “Sweeney Todd,” which are considered among his best work. His most famous ballad, “Send in the Clowns,” has been recorded hundreds of times, including by Frank Sinatra and Judy Collins.

 

“The theater has lost one of its greatest geniuses and the world has lost one of its greatest and most original writers. Sadly, there is now a giant in the sky. But the brilliance of Stephen Sondheim will still be here as his legendary songs and shows will be performed for evermore,” producer Cameron Mackintosh wrote in tribute.

 

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted: “Stephen Sondheim created fantastic worlds and characters, but at the heart of every story he told was a kid from New York City. And that kid was a legend. One of the brightest lights of Broadway is dark tonight. May he rest in peace.”

 

Six of Sondheim’s musicals won Tony Awards for best score, and he also received a Pulitzer Prize (“Sunday in the Park”), an Academy Award (for the song “Sooner or Later” from the film Dick Tracy), five Olivier Awards.

 

The New-York born composer also won eight Grammy Awards, nine Tony awards – including the special Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre – and one Academy Award.

 

In 2015, US President Barack Obama bestowed Sondheim the Presidential Medal of Freedom – the highest civilian award – for his work.

 

Early in his career, Sondheim wrote the lyrics for two shows considered to be classics of the American stage, “West Side Story” (1957) and “Gypsy” (1959). “West Side Story,” with music by Leonard Bernstein, transplanted Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” to the streets and gangs of modern-day New York. “Gypsy,” with music by Jule Styne, told the backstage story of the ultimate stage mother and the daughter who grew up to be Gypsy Rose Lee.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

BREAKING NEWS

In recent political developments in Nigeria, the Arewa Consultative Forum (ACF), a prominent socio-political organization representing the interests of the Northern region, has expressed...

BREAKING NEWS

Former President Donald Trump has made a bold pledge to bring an end to the ongoing Russian-Ukrainian war following what he described as “productive...

BREAKING NEWS

The world of sports, particularly football, is often a crucible for intense national pride, passionate displays of emotion, and, sometimes, regrettable incidents. One such...

BREAKING NEWS

In the wake of a tense political climate in Edo State, Nigeria, the All Progressives Congress (APC) has made an overture to Philip Shaibu,...